How to Keep Up With Child Support Obligations

Child support payments should be made a priority and everything must be done to make sure you can to pay them. Your child’s quality of life is at stake and you may face serious consequences if you fall behind on payments.

How to avoid defaulting on child support payments:

  1. Review your budget each and every spending reduction you can possibly make. If you don’t have a budget, it’s time to prepare one.
  2. Consider getting another job or doing freelance work. Use the additional income to pay your child support.
  3. Contact your creditor to lower your monthly payments. At DebtBusters we negotiate with your creditors on your behalf.
  4. Consolidate your debts to reduce the amount you have to pay your creditors each month.
  5. If you believe that your financial problems are temporary, borrow the money you need to meet your child support obligations.
  6. Sell assets. Sell what you can, and use the sale money to take care of your kids.
  7. If you can’t keep up with your child support payments and your mortgage or rent payments too, you may even need to consider selling your home.
  8. File for bankruptcy. You can’t use bankruptcy to wipe out past-due child support debt but you can use it to get rid of other debt preventing you from paying your child support.
  9. Asking the Court for a Modification: You can ask the court to lower how much you have to pay in child support each month if your financial circumstances have changed dramatically since the court order was written. If the judge decides to modify your payments on a temporary basis, the court will decide how long the modification will last and how much you pay while the modification is in effect. The judge might ask you to make up the difference by paying more than your original court order stated for a period of time when your modification ends. Or the judge may ask you to give the other parent an asset to make up the difference. You will increase your chances at getting a modification if the other parent accepts the terms of the modification.
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